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A brief report on the relationship between self-control, video game addiction and academic achievement in normal and ADHD students

Haghbin, Maryam and Shaterian, Fatemeh and Hosseinzadeh, Davood and Griffiths, Mark D. (2013) A brief report on the relationship between self-control, video game addiction and academic achievement in normal and ADHD students. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 2 (4). pp. 239-243. ISSN 2062-5871

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Abstract

Background and aims: Over the last two decades, research into video game addiction has grown increasingly. The present research aimed to examine the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement of normal and ADHD high school students. Based on previous research it was hypothesized that there would be a relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between male and female students, and the relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between normal students and ADHD students. Methods: The research population comprised first grade high school students of Khomeini-Shahr (a city in the central part of Iran). From this population, a sample group of 339 students participated in the study. The survey included the Game Addiction Scale (Lemmens, Valkenburg & Peter, 2009), the Self-Control Scale (Tangney, Baumeister & Boone, 2004) and the ADHD Diagnostic checklist (Kessler et al., 2007). In addition to questions relating to basic demographic information, students’ Grade Point Average (GPA) for two terms was used for measuring their academic achievement. These hypotheses were examined using a regression analysis. Results: Among Iranian students, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement differed between male and female students. However, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, academic achievement, and type of student was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Although the results cannot demonstrate a causal relationship between video game use, video game addiction, and academic achievement, they suggest that high involvement in playing video games leaves less time for engaging in academic work.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion / filozófia, pszichológia, vallás > BF Psychology / lélektan
Depositing User: xFruzsina xPataki
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2017 18:10
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2017 18:10
URI: http://real.mtak.hu/id/eprint/55396

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