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Salicylic Acid-Mediated Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Pál, Magda and Szalai, Gabriella and Kovács, Viktória and Gondor, Orsolya and Janda, Tibor (2013) Salicylic Acid-Mediated Abiotic Stress Tolerance. In: Salicylic Acid Plant Growth and Development. Springer, Neitherland, pp. 183-247. ISBN 978-94-007-6427-9

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Abstract

Plants are exposed to many environmental stresses, which are further aggravated by the effects of global climate change. So investigations on compounds capable of reducing the stress sensitivity of plants are of great importance. Salicylic acid is a phenolic compound produced to varying extents by a wide range of plant species. Its usefulness in human medicine was recognized much earlier than its role in plants. This endogenous plant growth regulator participates in many physiological and metabolic reactions. It was first demonstrated to play a role in responses to biotic stress. Soon afterwards; however, it became increasingly clear that salicylic acid also plays a role during the plant response to abiotic stresses such as heavy metal toxicity, heat, chilling, drought, UV-light and osmotic stress. Two kinds of evidence have accumulated to support this. First, endogenous salicylic acid levels rise in several species when they are exposed to abiotic stress conditions. Secondly, the application of salicylic acid at suitable concentrations induces stress tolerance in various plant species. The use of mutants and transgenic plants in which the synthesis, accumulation or translocation of salicylic acid is modified could help to clarify its molecular modes of action in physiological processes. Crosstalk with other hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid and cytokinin is important part of a finely tuned immune response network. It can be seen that SA exerts an effect at several levels and its effect also depends on several factors, such as the mode of application, the concentration, environmental conditions, plant species and organs, etc. In the present chapter a summary will be given of the relationship between SA and various abiotic stress factors in relation to biotic stress and other plant hormones, followed by a summary of the known physiological and biochemical effects of SA that may explain the change in stress tolerance.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: abiotic stress, oxidative stress, plant hormones, salicylic acid, signal transduction
Subjects: Q Science / természettudomány > Q1 Science (General) / természettudomány általában
Depositing User: PhD Magda Pál
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2013 15:19
Last Modified: 16 Dec 2013 08:56
URI: http://real.mtak.hu/id/eprint/7729

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