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Antibiotic resistance of Staphylococci from humans, food and different animal species according to data of the Hungarian resistance monitoring system in 2001

Kaszanyitzky, Éva J. and Jánosi, Sz. and Egyed, Zsuzsanna and Ágost, Gizella and Semjén, G. (2003) Antibiotic resistance of Staphylococci from humans, food and different animal species according to data of the Hungarian resistance monitoring system in 2001. Acta Veterinaria Hungarica, 51 (4). pp. 451-464. ISSN 0236-6290

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Abstract

Based on data of the Hungarian resistance monitoring system the antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus strains of human and animal origin was studied. No methicillin-resistant staphylococci harbouring mecA gene were isolated from animals in 2001. Penicillin resistance, mediated by penicillinase production, was the most frequent among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from humans (96%), from bovine mastitis (55%), from foods (45%) and from dogs. In staphylococci isolated from animals low resistance percentages to aminoglycosides (0-2%), fluoroquinolones (0.5-3%) and sulphonamides (0.5-4%) were found but in strains isolated humans these figures were higher (1-14%, 5-18% and 3-31%, respectively). The most frequent antibiotic resistance profiles of strains isolated from animals and food were penicillin/tetracycline, penicillin/lincomycin and penicillin/lincomycin/tetracycline. Penicillin/tetracycline resistance was exhibited by strains from mastitis (3), samples from the meat industry (31), poultry flocks (1), poultry industry (1), noodle (1) and horses (2). Penicillin/lincomycin resistance was found in 10 Staphylococcus strains from mastitis, 1 from the dairy industry, 1 from the meat industry and 6 from dogs. Isolates from mastitis (2), from the dairy industry (2), from pigs (1), from the meat industry (1) and from poultry (1) harboured penicillin/lincomycin/tetracycline resistance pattern. Multiresistant strains were usually isolated only from one and sometimes from two animal species; therefore, the spread of defined resistant strains (clones) among different animal species could not be demonstrated. These results also suggest that the transfer of antibiotic resistance of S. aureus from animals to humans probably occurs less frequently than is generally assumed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: S Agriculture / mezőgazdaság > SV Veterinary science / állatorvostudomány
Depositing User: xKatalin xBarta
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2017 11:44
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2017 11:44
URI: http://real.mtak.hu/id/eprint/49217

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