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Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases During Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats

Lutz, Jens and Yao, Yousheng and Song, Erwei and Antus, Balázs and Hamar, Péter and Liu, Shanying and Heemann, Uwe (2005) Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases During Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats. Transplantation, 79 (6). pp. 655-661. ISSN 0041-1337

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Abstract

Background. Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) belongs to the major causes of long-term kidney allograft failure. One of the histologic hallmarks of CAN is interstitial fibrosis, influenced by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that are controlling extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Whether MMPs affect the development and progression of CAN is not clear so far. To analyze the role of MMps in CAN, we investigated the effects of an early and a late application of BAY 12-9566, an inhibitor of MMP-2, -3, and -9 on the development and progression of CAN in a rat kidneytransplantation model. Methods. Fisher kidneys were orthotopically transplanted into Lewis recipients that were treated with BAY 12-9566 (15 mg/kg per day) or vehicle either for the first 10 days after transplantation (early treatment) or from week 12 to week 20 after transplantation (late treatment). Proteinuria was analyzed every 4 weeks up to week 20 after transplantation when kidney grafts were removed for further analysis. Results. Early MMP-inhibition resulted in a significantly reduced 24-hour protein excretion that was paralleled by a lower grade of CAN after 20 weeks. However, late MMP inhibition starting at week 12 after transplantation resulted in significantly higher proteinuria and a higher grade of CAN as compared with controls. Furthermore, transforming growth factor-beta and platelet- derived growth factor-B chain mRNA levels were significantly increased in these animals. Conclusions. Inhibition of MMPs early after transplantation reduced the development and progression of CAN but promoted CAN if initiated at later stages. Thus, MMI's are involved in the development and progression of CAN.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science / természettudomány > QR Microbiology / mikrobiológia > QR180 Immunology / immunológia
R Medicine / orvostudomány > RZ Other systems of medicine / orvostudomány egyéb területei
Depositing User: Erika Bilicsi
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2012 13:27
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2012 13:27
URI: http://real.mtak.hu/id/eprint/3157

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